Campus Life / Education / Virginia

UVA grad sues education officials over sexual assault policy

FILE- This Wednesday, March 14, 2012 photo shows attorney Wendy Murphy in the law library at the New England School of Law in Boston. As colleges nationwide face increasing pressure to aggressively investigate reports of sex assaults, some advocates think they've found a way to restore what they say is much-needed balance between the rights of the accuser and the accused. Their target: a "Dear Colleague Letter" issued by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights in 2011 that laid out specific requirements for dealing with sexual violence under Title IX, a federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

FILE- Wendy Murphy in the law library at the New England School of Law in Boston. As colleges nationwide face increasing pressure to aggressively investigate reports of sex assaults, some advocates think they’ve found a way to restore what they say is much-needed balance between the rights of the accuser and the accused. Their target: a “Dear Colleague Letter” issued by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights in 2011 that laid out specific requirements for dealing with sexual violence under Title IX, a federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former University of Virginia law student disciplined for sexual misconduct is suing the Department of Education over the way colleges evaluate allegations of sexual assault on campus.

The student is not named in the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Washington. The lawsuit says he was allowed to graduate after being found responsible for a sexual misconduct claim against him, but a Washington-area law firm suspended its employment offer.

The student’s lawsuit argues that a 2011 education department directive that changed the way sexual assault is evaluated bypassed the normal procedure of notifying the public of a proposed rule and seeking a response before imposing new regulations. The lawsuit says that’s a violation of the Administrative Procedure Act.

A university spokesman says privacy laws prevent him from commenting.

 

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