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This photo provided by the Stillwater Police Department on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015 shows Adacia Chambers. Police said Chambers plowed her car into a crowd of spectators Saturday during the Oklahoma State University homecoming parade. (Stillwater Police Department via AP)

This photo provided by the Stillwater Police Department on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015 shows Adacia Chambers. Police said Chambers plowed her car into a crowd of spectators Saturday during the Oklahoma State University homecoming parade. (Stillwater Police Department via AP)

RE (AP) — A former Episcopal bishop who killed a bicyclist in Baltimore while driving drunk has been sentenced to seven years in prison.

Heather Cook, who was the second ranking Episcopal bishop in Maryland, pleaded guilty last month to manslaughter, drunken driving and leaving the scene. She fatally struck 41-year-old cyclist Tom Palermo on Dec. 27. The impact threw Palermo onto Cook’s hood and into the windshield of her car. He died of severe blunt force trauma to the head, leaving behind a wife and two young children.

Prosecutors say Bishop Cook left the scene for 30 minutes before returning. She was texting when the accident occurred, and her blood-alcohol level was 0.22 percent, almost three times the legal limit. The church asked for and received her resignation.

A judge sentenced Cook on Tuesday to 20 years with all but seven suspended. Prosecutors had asked for a 10-year prison term.

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Congressman: US should welcome persecuted Mideast Christians

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House Republican says Christians face genocide in the Middle Eastand should be allowed to immigrate to the United States.

California Congressman Dana Rohrabacher spoke Tuesday at a subcommittee hearing on “The Global Crisis of Religious Freedom.”

Rohrabacher said that in parts of the Mideast controlled by the Islamic State group, Christians “are being targeted for extinction.”

He said, “Our immigration policy from that part of the world should put anyone who is a target of genocide at the top of the list of priorities of being admitted to the United States.”

Rohrabacher said the U.S. should be a safe haven for those facing some of the world’s worst religious persecution.

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Leah Remini talks to ’20/20′ about Tom Cruise, Scientology

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Leah Remini is talking about Scientology and Tom Cruise in a new interview with ABC’s “20/20.”

The actress says in a clip released Monday that “being critical of Tom Cruise is being critical of Scientology itself.” The interview is scheduled to air Friday at 10 p.m. EDT.

Remini was raised as a Scientologist but left the church two years ago. Her memoir, “Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology,” is set for release next month.

Representatives for Cruise and the Church of Scientology did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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OSU suspect’s relatives say they’re praying for crash victims

STILLWATER, Okla. (AP) — Relatives of a motorist accused of killing four people at Oklahoma State University’s homecoming parade say they’re praying for the victims.

The father, aunt and boyfriend of 25-year-old Adacia (uh-DAY’-shuh) Chambers appeared outside the Payne County Courthouse on Monday shortly before Chambers’ first appearance via video in court. She’s being held on $1 million bond on four preliminary counts of second-degree murder in Saturday’s fatal crash.

Her father, Floyd Chambers, said he raised his children to be “good Christian people” who pray for those who are hurting. He said he can’t conceive of her driving into the crowd on purpose.

But a prosecutor at Monday’s hearing said Adacia Chambers “purposely” ran a red light and went around a barricade before crashing into the spectators.

She was ordered to undergo a psychological evaluation.

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Salem witch takes warlock to court over alleged harassment

SALEM, Mass. (AP) — A Salem, Massachusetts, woman who calls herself a witch priestess is taking a self-proclaimed warlock to court over accusations of harassment.

Lori Sforza is accusing Christian Day of making repeated calls to her home late at night and swearing at her, and making malicious posts on social media. Sforza and Day will meet in court on Wednesday. A lawyer for Day declined to comment.

Sforza runs a witchcraft shop and a pagan church in Salem. Day owns occult shops in Salem and New Orleans. A lawyer for Sforza said the pair had been business associates in Salem before things went awry in recent years.

Salem is home to the 17th century witch trials and has a tourism industry built around the occult and Halloween that reaches fever pitch in October.

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