Middle East

Group: Desperate situation for many South Sudan civilians

FILE - In this Wednesday, April 20, 2011 file photo, opposition leader Kiiza Besigye speaks during a rally in Kampala, Uganda. An opposition leader in Uganda who is running for president is under house arrest to prevent him from holding rallies that have been called illegal by the government, a police spokeswoman said. Kiiza Besigye of the Forum for Democratic Change party is being detained in his own home near the capital, Kampala, as a preventive measure “to ensure that there is no breach of peace,” said police spokeswoman Polly Namaye on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi,File)

FILE – In this Wednesday, April 20, 2011 file photo, opposition leader Kiiza Besigye speaks during a rally in Kampala, Uganda. An opposition leader in Uganda who is running for president is under house arrest to prevent him from holding rallies that have been called illegal by the government, a police spokeswoman said. Kiiza Besigye of the Forum for Democratic Change party is being detained in his own home near the capital, Kampala, as a preventive measure “to ensure that there is no breach of peace,” said police spokeswoman Polly Namaye on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi,File)

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Despite a peace agreement, violence against civilians is continuing with killings, rapes and abductions, a consortium of more than 300 civic and aid groups in South Sudan said Thursday.

The humanitarian situation is deteriorating amid persistent fighting, with aid groups having trouble getting to hard-hit communities, South Sudan’s NGO Forum said in a statement Thursday.

“This conflict is driving up the cost of delivering assistance and risking the lives of thousands of people in need,” it said.

Between April and September at least 1,000 civilians were killed, and 1,300 women and girls were abducted in three counties in the volatile state of Unity, it said, citing a report by the Global Protection Cluster.

South Sudan’s warring factions signed a peace deal in August, but they have since been trading accusations over repeated violations of a cease-fire, especially in the contested states of Unity and Upper Nile.

The situation for civilians is “desperate and getting worse” as fighting spreads to another state, Western Equatoria, according to the NGO Forum.

Aid groups such as the International Committee of the Red Cross have had to limit their operations in violence-prone areas, leaving many civilians without access to relief supplies.

Tens of thousands of people have been killed by South Sudan’s conflict and 2 million have been displaced, according to the U.N.

Under the terms of the peace deal that was signed under the mediation of regional leaders, rebel leader Riek Machar, whose firing in July 2013 sparked a political crisis that later boiled over into a rebellion against President Salva Kiir, is expected to return to his post as Kiir’s deputy in November.

The fighting has often been along ethnic lines, pitting soldiers loyal to Kiir, an ethnic Dinka, against those from Machar’s Nuer ethnic group.

 

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