Education

Slain civil rights activist to receive posthumous degree

 

 

FILE- In this 1943 file photo Viola Gregg Liuzzo of Detroit is shown. Gregg Luizzo, a 39-year-old mother of five, was ambushed and killed by Klansmen in her car, as she was shuttling marchers in Selma on March 26, 1965. Wayne State University plans to give an honorary doctor of laws degree to Liuzzo during a ceremony on April 10. It will be the first posthumous honorary degree in the school’s history. (AP Photo)

FILE- In this 1943 file photo Viola Gregg Liuzzo of Detroit is shown. Gregg Luizzo, a 39-year-old mother of five, was ambushed and killed by Klansmen in her car, as she was shuttling marchers in Selma on March 26, 1965. Wayne State University plans to give an honorary doctor of laws degree to Liuzzo during a ceremony on April 10. It will be the first posthumous honorary degree in the school’s history. (AP Photo)

DETROIT (AP) — For 24 years, a stone marker has stood along U.S. 80 in Alabama near the spot where Viola Gregg Liuzzo (lee-OO-zoh) was fatally shot by Klansmen while shuttling demonstrators after the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery voting rights march.

Wayne State University plans to give an honorary doctor of laws degree to Liuzzo during a ceremony on April 10. It will be the first posthumous honorary degree in the school’s history.

A tree or green space also will be dedicated. Liuzzo had studied nursing at Wayne State before joining the civil rights movement.

Liuzzo’s five adult children have been invited to the ceremony. Liuzzo’s husband, Anthony Liuzzo Sr., died in 1978.

Liuzzo’s daughter, Mary Liuzzo Lilleboe, says the degree is a great honor for her mother, who she calls “a civil rights giant.”

 

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