National / Politics / Technology / TV

Do police shoot out of fear or racial bias?

In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, center, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)

In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, center, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)

An editorial by Shaye Southall

At this point in time, cell phones are the judge, jury, and executioner. For just about every officer involved shooting of an unarmed black man or Latino man, there is a witness that captures the fatal moments on film. This phenomenon has been taking place throughout history, but America is seeing it almost live as they eat dinner, change their babies, sit in barber shops or beauty salons. But the past couple of years, the media has created this imagery: individuals are unarmed, hands raised, or simply disagreeing with law enforcement while the individual is being detained….then they are killed.

What I have noticed is, rarely is a video of an officer-involved shooting of an unarmed white person. What is shown is a video of a standoff with an armed white person, resisting arrest, using vulgar language or, simply put, wrestling with police officers when the use of force would have been used if the suspect were……maybe, black?

Terence Crutcher, a pastor, father, a brother, and another unarmed black American was shot and killed by a police officer along with being tazed Friday, Sept. 23. His car had broken down in the road after coming from school. He was confronted by three or four officers with his hands raised, was shot and left for dead in the middle of the street! This was caught on camera from multiple angles. But the sad part of this tragic occurrence is the comment “he looks like a bad dude!” said by one of the helicopter crew.

Is this a reason for getting killed by the police? White Americans make up the majority of the United States while Black Americans account for about 13.2% and the Hispanic and Latino are 17%. Blacks are still shot and killed at 2.5 times more than White Americans. But why? If cops are that fearful of black men, then why become cops?

“I feared for my life” is the most common term used in most of these malicious shootings. Why do cops fear an unarmed black man more than they fear an unarmed white terrorist?

Look at Dylan Roof for example. He goes into a black church and kills nine people. With body armor on, he was taken to Burger King before taken to jail. This guy just killed nine African Americans worshiping in church. Seriously?

James Holmes walks into a movie theater and opens fire, killing 12, wounding 70. Holmes was arrested, while armed, and lived to face trial.

In today’s society, how can a black male look at law enforcement and not wonder what their intentions are? In a routine traffic stop, what procedures should they a follow to ensure they will not become the next Sandra Bland?

Eric Garner, killed by an illegal choke hold for selling cigarettes. Tamir Rice, another unarmed African American child, shot dead for playing with a toy gun like most kids his age at a playground by himself.

Are cops likely to shoot an unarmed African American based on fear? Or is it racially motivated? These are questions you should ask yourself when watching a live video of a cop killing an unarmed black man.