Politics / Virginia

Governor: Most whose rights were restored are nonviolent

Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds up the order he signed to restore rights to felons in Virginia at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Friday, April 22, 2016. More than 200,000 convicted felons will be able to cast ballots in the swing state of Virginia in November's election under a sweeping executive order by McAuliffe announced Friday that restores their rights to vote and run for office. (Mark Gormus /Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds up the order he signed to restore rights to felons in Virginia at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Friday, April 22, 2016. More than 200,000 convicted felons will be able to cast ballots in the swing state of Virginia in November’s election under a sweeping executive order by McAuliffe announced Friday that restores their rights to vote and run for office. (Mark Gormus /Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s office says 80 percent of more than 200,000 convicted felons whose voting and other civil rights he recently restored were convicted of nonviolent crimes.

The governor’s office said Wednesday, May 11, that an analysis of the 200,000 convicted felons also shows that African-Americans accounted for 46 percent, while blacks make up only 19 percent of the state’s population.

McAuliffe issued a sweeping order last month restoring the rights of felons who have completed their prison and parole sentences to vote, sit on juries and run for office.

GOP House Speaker William J. Howell said Wednesday that the governor’s own analysis shows that 40,000 felons convicted of violent crimes will now be eligible to sit on juries, something Republicans oppose.
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