Science

Karolinska University to investigate stem-cell scientist

FILE - In this March 7, 2015 file photo, a health worker, left, injects a man in his arm with an Ebola vaccine in Conakry, Guinea. In the biggest study to test whether the blood of Ebola survivors helps patients, doctors found the experimental treatment didn’t make a difference and some scientists say it’s time to shelve the approach.  With no licensed treatment for the devastating disease, doctors have sometimes used blood from survivors to treat the sick, hoping its infection-fighting antibodies might help patients defeat the virus. It seemed to help some patients in the past but there was no clear proof. Amid the world’s biggest outbreak of Ebola in West Africa in 2014, scientists decided to put the treatment to the test in Guinea.  (AP Photo/Youssouf Bah, File)

FILE – In this March 7, 2015 file photo, a health worker, left, injects a man in his arm with an Ebola vaccine in Conakry, Guinea. In the biggest study to test whether the blood of Ebola survivors helps patients, doctors found the experimental treatment didn’t make a difference and some scientists say it’s time to shelve the approach. With no licensed treatment for the devastating disease, doctors have sometimes used blood from survivors to treat the sick, hoping its infection-fighting antibodies might help patients defeat the virus. It seemed to help some patients in the past but there was no clear proof. Amid the world’s biggest outbreak of Ebola in West Africa in 2014, scientists decided to put the treatment to the test in Guinea. (AP Photo/Youssouf Bah, File)

LONDON (AP) — Sweden’s Karolinska University says it is commissioning an external investigation into stem-cell scientist Paolo Macchiarini, who was cleared last year of misconduct charges related to his creation of wind pipes made from patients’ stem cells.

In a statement on Friday, the university said it would commission a lawyer to investigate issues including whether Macchiarini broke any laws or standard scientific protocols.

Last month, Macchiarini was the focus of a Swedish documentary that raised ethical concerns about several operations performed by him, which Karolinska described as “truly alarming.” A Vanity Fair article last month also suggested Macchiarini had falsified his CV.

On Thursday, the university announced it was not renewing his contract beyond Nov. 30 and that he was expected to use his remaining time to dismantle his research group.

 

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